News
Search

A Marine Raider was awarded the Silver Star Medal for heroic actions while deployed to Afghanistan in 2019, at a ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. July 10, 2020. - A Marine Raider was awarded the Silver Star Medal for heroic actions while deployed to Afghanistan in 2019, at a ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. July 10, 2020. The master sergeant and Critical Skills Operator, was serving as a Team Chief with 2nd Marine Raider Battalion in support of Operation Freedom’s Sentinel when his team was engaged by enemy combatants. According to the award citation, during a heliborne raid into difficult enemy-controlled terrain in Southern Afghanistan, he led his team of Marine Raiders and partner nation forces in four hours of close combat with more than a dozen Taliban fighters occupying defensive strongholds. The Team Chief exposed himself to enemy fire to lead an assault across 30 meters of open terrain, attacking Taliban fighters entrenched in a bunker with his rifle and hand grenades. While he and his team took accurate enemy fire, the Team Chief again exposed himself by climbing on top a building to employ a roof charge in order to recover a wounded Afghan soldier. With enemy fighters barricaded just a few feet away, he heroically pulled the wounded man to a covered position in a valiant attempt to save his life, while allowing his team to engage the barricaded fighters with fragmentation grenades.

Marines with 3rd Assault Amphibian Battalion from 1st Marine Division participated in Marine Forces Special Operations Command's unit readiness exercise, RAVEN. The training conducted provides exposure to small unit tactics they might not otherwise receive, particularly units like 3rd AABN, whose day-to-day responsibilities are focused on amphibious assault vehicle readiness, basic formations and water ops, and terrain driving. The exercise serves as the certification exercise for a soon-to-be deploying Marine Special Operations Company. It has evolved into a multilevel venue to integrate the various command structures and capabilities deployed by MARSOC. Each level of command, down to the team, is challenged in planning and executing, and command and controlling activities in urban environments. It is also an opportunity to enhance collaboration and strengthen our operational relationships between members of the SOF community, conventional Marine Corps units and other partners with whom Marine Raiders work closely, ensuring MARSOC provides the nation with an agile, adaptive force to meet the complex demands of the future operating environment. - Marines with 3rd Assault Amphibian Battalion from 1st Marine Division participated in Marine Forces Special Operations Command's unit readiness exercise, RAVEN. The training conducted provides exposure to small unit tactics they might not otherwise receive, particularly units like 3rd AABN, whose day-to-day responsibilities are focused on amphibious assault vehicle readiness, basic formations and water ops, and terrain driving. The exercise serves as the certification exercise for a soon-to-be deploying Marine Special Operations Company. It has evolved into a multilevel venue to integrate the various command structures and capabilities deployed by MARSOC. Each level of command, down to the team, is challenged in planning and executing, and command and controlling activities in urban environments. It is also an opportunity to enhance collaboration and strengthen our operational relationships between members of the SOF community, conventional Marine Corps units and other partners with whom Marine Raiders work closely, ensuring MARSOC provides the nation with an agile, adaptive force to meet the complex demands of the future operating environment.

The commander of Marine Forces Special Operations Command, Maj. Gen. Daniel D. Yoo, along with the other U.S. Special Operations Command service component commanders, participated in the 'Industry Role in Current Readiness and Future Capabilities of Special Operations Forces' panel to address the topic of preserving and growing readiness to maximize each service's current competitive edge, during the opening day of the Special Operations Industry Conference in Tampa, May 21, 2019. Yoo took the opportunity to highlight the key tenants outlined in the component's Marine Special Operations Forces 2030 document published in April 2018: Cognitive Operator, MARSOF as a Connector, Enterprise Level Agility and Combined Arms for the Connected Arena. These concepts represent the ‘what’; conceptual visions which can provide MARSOC distinct value in the future operating environment. - The commander of Marine Forces Special Operations Command, Maj. Gen. Daniel D. Yoo, along with the other U.S. Special Operations Command service component commanders, participated in the 'Industry Role in Current Readiness and Future Capabilities of Special Operations Forces' panel to address the topic of preserving and growing readiness to maximize each service's current competitive edge, during the opening day of the Special Operations Industry Conference in Tampa, May 21, 2019. Yoo took the opportunity to highlight the key tenants outlined in the component's Marine Special Operations Forces 2030 document published in April 2018: Cognitive Operator, MARSOF as a Connector, Enterprise Level Agility and Combined Arms for the Connected Arena. These concepts represent the ‘what’; conceptual visions which can provide MARSOC distinct value in the future operating environment.

A Marine Raider participates in the land navigation portion of the annual Marine Forces Special Operations Command 2019 Marine Raider Competition on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 12, 2019. The competition fostered camaraderie and tested participants’ operational capabilities consistent with special operations missions through a rigorous evolution of events and to honor Marine Raider heritage. The competition consisted of six teams of six participants hailing from 1st Marine Raider Battalion, 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, 3rd Marine Raider Battalion, Marine Raider Training Center and 2nd Marine Reconnaissance Battalion. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Morgan D. Collett) - A Marine Raider participates in the land navigation portion of the annual Marine Forces Special Operations Command 2019 Marine Raider Competition on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 12, 2019. The competition fostered camaraderie and tested participants’ operational capabilities consistent with special operations missions through a rigorous evolution of events and to honor Marine Raider heritage. The competition consisted of six teams of six participants hailing from 1st Marine Raider Battalion, 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, 3rd Marine Raider Battalion, Marine Raider Training Center and 2nd Marine Reconnaissance Battalion. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Morgan D. Collett)

Retired Sgt. Maj. Carlton Kent provides opening remarks during a military resiliency event held by the Mighty Oaks Foundation at Marine Forces Special Operations Command on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., August 12, 2019. The resiliency event was conducted by Might Oaks founder, Chad M. Robichaux, to provided information to Marines and Sailors about the Mighty Oaks Warrior Program. The program uses a grassroots approach, empowering veterans and active duty members to begin their healing and then be a positive impact on those in their surrounding communities. Through the methodologies used and the evaluation of those who have experienced combat, Robichaux and his team discovered that the same methods used to “heal” PTSD are equally effective if implemented prior to traumatic events such as those experienced in combat. Knouse, Kent, and Evans have all attended Robichaux’s program, bringing back with them a new understanding of post-traumatic stress and different tools to help combat the effects. Robichaux and his wife, Kathy, founded Mighty Oaks in 2011 with the goal to share their story through the trials of PTS and assist others along the path to recovery and success. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Bryann K. Whitley) - Retired Sgt. Maj. Carlton Kent provides opening remarks during a military resiliency event held by the Mighty Oaks Foundation at Marine Forces Special Operations Command on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., August 12, 2019. The resiliency event was conducted by Might Oaks founder, Chad M. Robichaux, to provided information to Marines and Sailors about the Mighty Oaks Warrior Program. The program uses a grassroots approach, empowering veterans and active duty members to begin their healing and then be a positive impact on those in their surrounding communities. Through the methodologies used and the evaluation of those who have experienced combat, Robichaux and his team discovered that the same methods used to “heal” PTSD are equally effective if implemented prior to traumatic events such as those experienced in combat. Knouse, Kent, and Evans have all attended Robichaux’s program, bringing back with them a new understanding of post-traumatic stress and different tools to help combat the effects. Robichaux and his wife, Kathy, founded Mighty Oaks in 2011 with the goal to share their story through the trials of PTS and assist others along the path to recovery and success. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Bryann K. Whitley)

Marines and Sailors with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, demonstrate proper removal of a gas mask from a simulated chemical contact victim while training for the medical management of chemical and biological causalties during an exercise at Stone Bay on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Dec. 6, 2017. Long prohibited by international agreements, chemical weapons have been increasingly used on the battlefield by American adversaries including violent extremist organizations. Raiders gained valuable practical application skills in handling casualties in complex and dangerous chemical environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno, released) - Marines and Sailors with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, demonstrate proper removal of a gas mask from a simulated chemical contact victim while training for the medical management of chemical and biological causalties during an exercise at Stone Bay on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Dec. 6, 2017. Long prohibited by international agreements, chemical weapons have been increasingly used on the battlefield by American adversaries including violent extremist organizations. Raiders gained valuable practical application skills in handling casualties in complex and dangerous chemical environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno, released)

Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command