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U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command

 

U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command

Camp Lejeune, NC

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Combating chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction
Marines and Sailors with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, demonstrate proper removal of a gas mask from a simulated chemical contact victim while training for the medical management of chemical and biological causalties during an exercise at Stone Bay on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Dec. 6, 2017. Long prohibited by international agreements, chemical weapons have been increasingly used on the battlefield by American adversaries including violent extremist organizations. Raiders gained valuable practical application skills in handling casualties in complex and dangerous chemical environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno, released)
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Robot dog improves SOF medical practices
A multi-purpose canine handler with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, controls a laceration on a realistic canine mannequin during MPC medical training at Stone Bay on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Dec. 1, 2017. During this training, MPC handlers practice applying canine medical aid on the new “robot dog” for the first time, which is in its final stages of testing and development. (Photo by Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley)
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Gulf Coast hosts realistic military training RAVEN
Marines with Marine Air Control Group-28 and 2nd Marine Information Group conduct a simulated high value target detention exercise with the guidance of Marines from 1st Marine Raider Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command in Hattiesburg, Miss., Nov. 6, 2017. Marines with 1st MRB participated in RAVEN 18-02, a 10-day realistic military training exercise designed to enhance the battalion’s readiness for upcoming deployments. Marines with MACG-28 and 2nd MIG played the role of partner nation forces during the exercise. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley)
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MPC Handler awarded Bronze Star with Combat “V”
MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. – Maj. Gen. Carl E. Mundy III, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command commander, awards the Bronze Star Medal with Combat “V” to Staff Sgt. Patrick H. Maloney, multi-purpose canine handler with 2D Marine Raider Battalion, at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Oct. 30, 2017. While deployed in support of Operation Inherent Resolve in August 2016, Maloney exposed himself to enemy fire to employ a heavy machinegun mounted in an open truck bed during an enemy ambush. Despite two weapon malfunctions, Maloney effectively suppressed and disrupted the ambush, allowing Raiders to repel the attackers. Maj. Gen. Mundy presented the award on behalf of the President. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno, released)
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Lance Corporals take on Fort Macon history
Randy Newman, park superintendent, demonstrates proper musket-firing procedures to Marines from U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command’s Lance Corporal Leadership and Ethics Seminar during a tour at Fort Macon State Park, N.C., Oct. 18, 2017. The Marines learned Civil War history, tactics and small unit leadership that they will later evaluate in their advanced military education seminars. The focus of the Lance Corporal Seminar is to enhance small unit leadership, educate junior leaders on Marine Corps doctrine and principles and sustain the transformation of all Marines that begins in bootcamp. The course covers Marine Corps values and ethics, foundations of leadership, personal conduct and a holistic approach to fitness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley, released)
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Navy Celebrates 242nd Birthday
The most junior and senior Sailors, a 20-year-old hospitalman with Marine Raider Support Group, and Cmdr. Mark S. Winward, 57-year-old command chaplain for U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, use a Naval Officer's Sword to make the ceremonial first cut of the a birthday cake honoring the Navy’s 242nd birthday at MARSOC Headquarters on Camp Lejeune, N.C., Oct. 13, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno/Released)
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Last living WWII Frogman relives history
A group photo of the Office of Strategic Services Special Maritime Unit Group A frogmen from World War II on Santa Catalina Island, Calif., December 1943. Erick Simmel, OSS Maritime Unit descendant and historical expert on World War II special operations forces, presented a lecture alongside the last living frogman from the OSS Maritime Unit, Henry Weldon. The lecture was given to Marines from 1st Marine Raider Support Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, in order to reinforce the historical wartime legacy of the Marine Raiders in World War II. (Courtesy Photo)
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Tips and passes to final baskets, MARSOC’s fight against the clock
Maurice Givens, the Raiders’ coach, moves the ball down the court during the championship game of the 2017 USAA Commanding General’s Cup basketball tournament at Paige Fieldhouse on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Sept. 28, 2017. 1st Marine Raider Support Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command lost to Assault Amphibian School Battalion 84-74 and breaking their 13-0 winning streak. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley)
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Basic Language Course bridges language barriers
Critical skills operators with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, use their target language to build rapport with town's people during a week-long, simulated deployed role play event at the Infantry Immersion Trainer on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Sept. 19, 2017. The event is a constantly moving cultural specific environment where students are engaged by role players over various scenarios. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley)
Sgt. Ethan Mawhinney, a Marine Air Ground Task Force planner with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, successfully defended his championship title at the Marine Corps third annual HITT Tactical Athlete Competition at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Aug. 28th through 31st, 2017.  The competition brings together the top male and female Marines from each Marine Corps installation in a demanding competition of military function fitness and to promote the advanced dynamics found in the High Intensity Tactical Training program.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley)
MARSOC Marine retains title as Ultimate Tactical Athlete
Sgt. Ethan Mawhinney, a Marine Air Ground Task Force planner with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, successfully defended his championship title at the Marine Corps third annual HITT Tactical Athlete Competition at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Aug. 28th through 31st, 2017. The competition brings together the top male and female Marines from each Marine Corps installation in a demanding competition of military function fitness and to promote the advanced dynamics found in the High Intensity Tactical Training program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley)
U. S. Special Operations Command’s Special Operations Forces Civilian Leadership Development Program (SOF CLDP) visited U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 5th through 7th, 2017.
Special Ops Civilians Visit MARSOC
U. S. Special Operations Command’s Special Operations Forces Civilian Leadership Development Program (SOF CLDP) visited U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 5th through 7th, 2017.
Critical skills operators with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command train with freeze-dried plasma during a Raven pre-deployment exercise at Camp Shelby Joint Force Training Center, Miss., May 1, 2017.
Rugged blood for rugged men: freeze dried plasma saves a SOF life
Critical skills operators with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command train with freeze-dried plasma during a Raven pre-deployment exercise at Camp Shelby Joint Force Training Center, Miss., May 1, 2017.
A critical skills operator with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, hangs the dog tags for one of seven fallen service members onto 2d Marine Raider Battalion’s soldier’s cross display at a celebration of life ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 31, 2017. Each person who spoke on behalf of one of the fallen service members, hung their respective dog tags onto the cross, which will be displayed at 2d MRB’s headquarters building. The ceremony honored the seven MARSOC service members lost July 10 in a KC-130T Hercules transport aircraft crash, including Staff Sgts. Robert Cox and William Kundrat, Navy special amphibious reconnaissance corpsman, Petty Officer 1st Class Ryan Lohrey , and Sgts. Chad Jenson, Dietrich Schmieman, Joseph Murray, and Talon Leach. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno, released)
Seven Fallen Raiders Honored
A critical skills operator with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, hangs the dog tags for one of seven fallen service members onto 2d Marine Raider Battalion’s soldier’s cross display at a celebration of life ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 31, 2017.
Maj. Gen. Carl E. Mundy III, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command commander, gives a condolence speech during a celebration of life ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 31, 2017. The ceremony honored the seven MARSOC service members lost July 10 in a KC-130T Hercules transport aircraft crash. The seven included Staff Sgts. Robert Cox and William Kundrat, Navy special amphibious reconnaissance corpsman, Petty Officer 1st Class Ryan Lohrey , and Sgts. Chad Jenson, Dietrich Schmieman, Joseph Murray and Talon Leach. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno, released)
Seven Fallen Raiders Honored
Maj. Gen. Carl E. Mundy III, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command commander, gives a condolence speech during a celebration of life ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 31, 2017.
William F. Landfear, a WWII Raider, talks with a current Marine Raider with 1st Marine Raider Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command during the 2017 Marine Raider Association Reunion in San Diego, Aug. 11.
MARSOC honors WWII Raiders at annual reunion
William F. Landfear, a WWII Raider, talks with a current Marine Raider with 1st Marine Raider Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command during the 2017 Marine Raider Association Reunion in San Diego, Aug. 11. Seventeen World War II Raiders attended the annual event at the San Diego Town and Country Resort, San Diego, where the USMRA hosted a 1940s USO-style dinner and dance for Marine Raiders of past and present. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno, released)
Harold S. Sheffield and Henry Kudzik, World War II Raiders, sit on the stage and participate in the entertainment portion of the evening with The Lindy Sisters during the 2017 Marine Raider Association Reunion in San Diego, Aug. 11.
MARSOC honors WWII Raiders at annual reunion
Harold S. Sheffield and Henry Kudzik, World War II Raiders, sit on the stage and participate in the entertainment portion of the evening with The Lindy Sisters during the 2017 Marine Raider Association Reunion in San Diego, Aug. 11. Seventeen World War II Raiders attended the annual event at the San Diego Town and Country Resort, San Diego, where the USMRA hosted a 1940s USO-style dinner and dance for Marine Raiders of past and present. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno, released)
A critical skills operator with 1st Marine Raider Support Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, places the Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle (JTARV) at a launch site prior to take off aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 7, 2017. The JTARV, which is in the developmental phase, is a lightweight autonomous vehicle which provides an aerial resupply capability for immediate support to operational units. It was being tested as a resupply platform for machine-gun sustainment training with a cargo unmanned logistics system (C-ULS) during a tactical readiness exercise (TRX).
Cargo-ULS takes flight with 1st MRSB
A critical skills operator with 1st Marine Raider Support Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, places the Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle (JTARV) at a launch site prior to take off aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 7, 2017. The JTARV, which is in the developmental phase, is a lightweight autonomous vehicle which provides an aerial resupply capability for immediate support to operational units. It was being tested as a resupply platform for machine-gun sustainment training with a cargo unmanned logistics system (C-ULS) during a tactical readiness exercise (TRX).
A critical skills operator with 1st Marine Raider Support Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, places the Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle (JTARV) at a launch site prior to take off aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 11. The JTARV, which is in the developmental phase, is a lightweight autonomous vehicle which provides an aerial resupply capability for immediate support to operational units. It was being tested as a resupply platform for machine-gun sustainment training with a cargo unmanned logistics system (C-ULS) during their TRX.
Cargo-ULS takes flight with 1st MRSB
A critical skills operator with 1st Marine Raider Support Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, places the Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle (JTARV) at a launch site prior to take off aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 11. The JTARV, which is in the developmental phase, is a lightweight autonomous vehicle which provides an aerial resupply capability for immediate support to operational units. It was being tested as a resupply platform for machine-gun sustainment training with a cargo unmanned logistics system (C-ULS) during their TRX.
A UAV pilot with 1st Marine Raider Support Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, preps the Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle (JTARV) for transport from a simulated forward operating base to a Marine Special Operations Company in the field aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 7, 2017. The unit conducted machine-gun sustainment training with a cargo unmanned logistics system (C-ULS) during a tactical readiness exercise (TRX) aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 6-11, 2017.
Cargo-ULS takes flight with 1st MRSB
A UAV pilot with 1st Marine Raider Support Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, preps the Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle (JTARV) for transport from a simulated forward operating base to a Marine Special Operations Company in the field aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 7, 2017. The unit conducted machine-gun sustainment training with a cargo unmanned logistics system (C-ULS) during a tactical readiness exercise (TRX) aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 6-11, 2017.
A Critical Skills Operator with 1st Marine Raider Support Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command gives a tour of a modified SUV to the commander of Special Operations Command Pacific, Maj. Gen. Daniel Yoo and SOCPAC sergeant major,  Sgt. Maj. Shane W. Shorter during a  Tactical Readiness Exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 10.  For the first time since assuming command of SOCPAC, Yoo, the first Marine to head a theater-level special operations command, met with the commanding officers of 1st MRSB and 1st Marine Raider Battalion, touring their facilities and visiting the exercise.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno, released)
SOCPAC Commander visits 1st MRSB
A Critical Skills Operator with 1st Marine Raider Support Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command gives a tour of a modified SUV to the commander of Special Operations Command Pacific, Maj. Gen. Daniel Yoo and SOCPAC sergeant major, Sgt. Maj. Shane W. Shorter during a Tactical Readiness Exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 10. For the first time since assuming command of SOCPAC, Yoo, the first Marine to head a theater-level special operations command, met with the commanding officers of 1st MRSB and 1st Marine Raider Battalion, touring their facilities and visiting the exercise. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno, released)
Maj. Gen. Carl E. Mundy III, commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, addresses the audience during a ceremony June 21, 2017 aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Marine Special Operations School was redesignated as the Marine Raider Training Center, reincarnating the name used for the training facility that produced Marine Raiders in World War II and which was disbanded in 1944.  (Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Scott Achtemeier, released)
A Legacy Inherited: Marine Raider Training Center Reactivates
Maj. Gen. Carl E. Mundy III, commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, addresses the audience during a ceremony June 21, 2017 aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Marine Special Operations School was redesignated as the Marine Raider Training Center, reincarnating the name used for the training facility that produced Marine Raiders in World War II and which was disbanded in 1944. (Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Scott Achtemeier, released)
U.S. Marine Col. Brett Bourne, commanding officer, Marine Raider Training Center, with Master Gunnery Sgt. Jerome Root, MRTC senior enlisted advisor,  uncase the new MRTC colors during a redesignation ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 21, 2017. The Marine Special Operations School was redesignated as the Marine Raider Training Center, reactivating the unit for the first time since the original Marine Raiders were disbanded in 1944. (Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Scott Achtemeier)
A Legacy Inherited: Marine Raider Training Center Reactivates
U.S. Marine Col. Brett Bourne, commanding officer, Marine Raider Training Center, with Master Gunnery Sgt. Jerome Root, MRTC senior enlisted advisor, uncase the new MRTC colors during a redesignation ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 21, 2017. The Marine Special Operations School was redesignated as the Marine Raider Training Center, reactivating the unit for the first time since the original Marine Raiders were disbanded in 1944. (Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Scott Achtemeier)
U.S. Marine Corps Marines and U.S. Air Force Airmen students perform scout swimmer training during Marine Special Operations School’s Individual Training Course, March 24, 2017, at Key West, Fla. For the first time, U.S. Air Force Special Tactics Airmen spent three months in Marine Special Operations Command’s initial Marine Raider training pipeline, representing efforts to build joint mindsets across special operations forces.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Conroy)
Air Force Special Tactics integrate into Marine Raider training
U.S. Marine Corps Marines and U.S. Air Force Airmen students perform scout swimmer training during Marine Special Operations School’s Individual Training Course, March 24, 2017, at Key West, Fla. For the first time, U.S. Air Force Special Tactics Airmen spent three months in Marine Special Operations Command’s initial Marine Raider training pipeline, representing efforts to build joint mindsets across special operations forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Conroy)
A U.S. Marine practices helocasting off a sea wall during Marine Special Operations School’s Individual Training Course, March 21, 2017, at Key West, Fla. For the first time, U.S. Air Force Special Tactics Airmen spent three months in Marine Special Operations Command’s initial Marine Raider training pipeline, representing efforts to build joint mindsets across special operations forces.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Conroy)
Air Force Special Tactics integrate into Marine Raider training
A U.S. Marine practices helocasting off a sea wall during Marine Special Operations School’s Individual Training Course, March 21, 2017, at Key West, Fla. For the first time, U.S. Air Force Special Tactics Airmen spent three months in Marine Special Operations Command’s initial Marine Raider training pipeline, representing efforts to build joint mindsets across special operations forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Conroy)
U.S. Marines and Airmen fire Kalashnikov AK-47 assault rifles during a foreign-weapons familiarization class at Marine Special Operations School’s Individual Training Course, April 10, 2017, at Camp Lejeune, N.C. For the first time, U.S. Air Force Special Tactics Airmen spent three months in Marine Special Operations Command’s initial Marine Raider training pipeline, representing efforts to build joint mindsets across special operations forces.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Conroy)
Air Force Special Tactics integrate into Marine Raider training
U.S. Marines and Airmen fire Kalashnikov AK-47 assault rifles during a foreign-weapons familiarization class at Marine Special Operations School’s Individual Training Course, April 10, 2017, at Camp Lejeune, N.C. For the first time, U.S. Air Force Special Tactics Airmen spent three months in Marine Special Operations Command’s initial Marine Raider training pipeline, representing efforts to build joint mindsets across special operations forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Conroy)
Marine Special Operations School Individual Training Course students fire an M249 squad automatic weapon during night-fire training April 13, 2017, at Camp Lejeune. For the first time, U.S. Air Force Special Tactics Airmen spent three months in Marine Special Operations Command’s initial Marine Raider training pipeline, representing efforts to build joint mindsets across special operations forces.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Conroy)
Air Force Special Tactics integrate into Marine Raider training
Marine Special Operations School Individual Training Course students fire an M249 squad automatic weapon during night-fire training April 13, 2017, at Camp Lejeune. For the first time, U.S. Air Force Special Tactics Airmen spent three months in Marine Special Operations Command’s initial Marine Raider training pipeline, representing efforts to build joint mindsets across special operations forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Conroy)
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. – U.S. Air Force Maj. Robert Riggs, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command air mobility liaison officer (AMLO), assists in loading cargo aboard a C-17 aircraft at MCAS Cherry Point. As MARSOC’s AMLO, Riggs provides a critical link of communication between the airlift and ground forces in the area of operations. He facilitated the mission from planning and coordination through hands-on facilitation by piloting the aircraft as it deployed and re-deployed two MARSOC units. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador Moreno, released)
MARSOC AMLO Streamlines Deployment Process
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. – U.S. Air Force Maj. Robert Riggs, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command air mobility liaison officer (AMLO), assists in loading cargo aboard a C-17 aircraft at MCAS Cherry Point. As MARSOC’s AMLO, Riggs provides a critical link of communication between the airlift and ground forces in the area of operations. He facilitated the mission from planning and coordination through hands-on facilitation by piloting the aircraft as it deployed and re-deployed two MARSOC units. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador Moreno, released)
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. – U.S. Air Force Maj. Robert Riggs, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command air mobility liaison officer (AMLO), prepares for his C-17 mission on the flight line at MCAS Cherry Point, N.C. Riggs drove down to Charleston, S.C., to operate the C-17 scheduled to deploy a Marine Special Operations Company to Africa and bring back a separate MSOC. The total flight took four days and visited four different countries on three continents. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador Moreno, released)
MARSOC AMLO Streamlines Deployment Process
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. – U.S. Air Force Maj. Robert Riggs, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command air mobility liaison officer (AMLO), prepares for his C-17 mission on the flight line at MCAS Cherry Point, N.C. Riggs drove down to Charleston, S.C., to operate the C-17 scheduled to deploy a Marine Special Operations Company to Africa and bring back a separate MSOC. The total flight took four days and visited four different countries on three continents. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador Moreno, released)
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. – U.S. Air Force Maj. Robert Riggs, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command air mobility liaison officer (AMLO), prepares for his mission on the flight deck of a C-17 aircraft at MCAS Cherry Point. As MARSOC’s AMLO, Riggs provides a critical link of communication between the airlift and ground forces in the area of operations. He facilitates the timely flow of critical information between the air mobility network and MARSOC units into sensitive, forward-deployed environments around the globe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador Moreno, released)
MARSOC AMLO Streamlines Deployment Process
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. – U.S. Air Force Maj. Robert Riggs, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command air mobility liaison officer (AMLO), prepares for his mission on the flight deck of a C-17 aircraft at MCAS Cherry Point. As MARSOC’s AMLO, Riggs provides a critical link of communication between the airlift and ground forces in the area of operations. He facilitates the timely flow of critical information between the air mobility network and MARSOC units into sensitive, forward-deployed environments around the globe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador Moreno, released)
Lt. Col. William L. Lombardo assumes command of 2d Marine Raider Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, from Lt. Col. Craig A. Wolfenbarger during a change of command ceremony aboard Courthouse Bay, Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., April 20, 2017. The exchange of the organizational colors symbolizes Wolfenbarger relinquishing his responsibilities as commanding officer of the battalion to Lombardo.  Lombardo assumes command after serving with MARSOC Headquarters, G-7 Training and Education Branch. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno)
2d Marine Raider Battalion welcomes new commander–
Lt. Col. William L. Lombardo assumes command of 2d Marine Raider Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, from Lt. Col. Craig A. Wolfenbarger during a change of command ceremony aboard Courthouse Bay, Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., April 20, 2017. The exchange of the organizational colors symbolizes Wolfenbarger relinquishing his responsibilities as commanding officer of the battalion to Lombardo. Lombardo assumes command after serving with MARSOC Headquarters, G-7 Training and Education Branch. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Salvador R. Moreno)
Brig. Gen. Mohammed Benlouali, operations commander for Morocco’s Southern Zone, speaks to the lead exercise instructor from a U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command (MARSOC) team at the opening ceremony for Exercise Flintlock 2017 Feb. 27, 2017. This year marks the tenth iteration of the special operations forces exercise, which focuses on building partner capacity and enhancing interoperability between 24 African and Western partners training in seven partner nations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Scott A. Achtemeier/ /RELEASED)
Flintlock 2017 opening ceremony in Morocco
Brig. Gen. Mohammed Benlouali, operations commander for Morocco’s Southern Zone, speaks to the lead exercise instructor from a U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command (MARSOC) team at the opening ceremony for Exercise Flintlock 2017 Feb. 27, 2017. This year marks the tenth iteration of the special operations forces exercise, which focuses on building partner capacity and enhancing interoperability between 24 African and Western partners training in seven partner nations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Scott A. Achtemeier/ /RELEASED)
Members of Morocco's special operations forces methodically clear buildings as part of a direct action raid, 3 March 2017, during Exercise Flintlock 2017. The operators partnered with Marines from U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command throughout the exercise in order to build interoperability and support their common goal of countering violent extremism across the region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Nick Mannweiler, released)
Flintlock 2017 direct action raid in Morocco
Members of Morocco's special operations forces methodically clear buildings as part of a direct action raid, 3 March 2017, during Exercise Flintlock 2017. The operators partnered with Marines from U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command throughout the exercise in order to build interoperability and support their common goal of countering violent extremism across the region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Nick Mannweiler, released)
The Marine Corps Engineer School and U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command conducted a joint Small Unit Water Survivability and Sustainability Course at Courthouse Bay aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., December 12, 2016.  In attendance were medical personnel from MARSOC, 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion, and the U.S. Army Special Operations Command.  The day-long training included classroom and practical application on how to conduct a water reconnaissance and effectively treat, store, and monitor safe potable water under austere deployment conditions unique to the Special Operations Command.  Attendees were provided hands-on training of small, mobile equipment capable of purifying sufficient quantities of natural water to meet the requirements of individual and team assets.  The course was collaboratively instructed by Marine Corps Engineer School, MARSOC Health Service Support/G4, and field water experts from the Navy and Marine Public Health Center and Army Public Health Center.
Small Unit Water Survivability and Sustainability Course
The Marine Corps Engineer School and U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command conducted a joint Small Unit Water Survivability and Sustainability Course at Courthouse Bay aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., December 12, 2016. In attendance were medical personnel from MARSOC, 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion, and the U.S. Army Special Operations Command. The day-long training included classroom and practical application on how to conduct a water reconnaissance and effectively treat, store, and monitor safe potable water under austere deployment conditions unique to the Special Operations Command. Attendees were provided hands-on training of small, mobile equipment capable of purifying sufficient quantities of natural water to meet the requirements of individual and team assets. The course was collaboratively instructed by Marine Corps Engineer School, MARSOC Health Service Support/G4, and field water experts from the Navy and Marine Public Health Center and Army Public Health Center.
The Marine Corps Engineer School and U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command conducted a joint Small Unit Water Survivability and Sustainability Course at Courthouse Bay aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., December 12, 2016.  In attendance were medical personnel from MARSOC, 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion, and the U.S. Army Special Operations Command.  The day-long training included classroom and practical application on how to conduct a water reconnaissance and effectively treat, store, and monitor safe potable water under austere deployment conditions unique to the Special Operations Command.  Attendees were provided hands-on training of small, mobile equipment capable of purifying sufficient quantities of natural water to meet the requirements of individual and team assets.  The course was collaboratively instructed by Marine Corps Engineer School, MARSOC Health Service Support/G4, and field water experts from the Navy and Marine Public Health Center and Army Public Health Center.
Small Unit Water Survivability and Sustainability Course
The Marine Corps Engineer School and U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command conducted a joint Small Unit Water Survivability and Sustainability Course at Courthouse Bay aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., December 12, 2016. In attendance were medical personnel from MARSOC, 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion, and the U.S. Army Special Operations Command. The day-long training included classroom and practical application on how to conduct a water reconnaissance and effectively treat, store, and monitor safe potable water under austere deployment conditions unique to the Special Operations Command. Attendees were provided hands-on training of small, mobile equipment capable of purifying sufficient quantities of natural water to meet the requirements of individual and team assets. The course was collaboratively instructed by Marine Corps Engineer School, MARSOC Health Service Support/G4, and field water experts from the Navy and Marine Public Health Center and Army Public Health Center.
The Latest News about MARSOC
Multi-Purpose Canine Handlers: integrated force multipliers By Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley | January 22, 2018
Combating chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction By Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley | December 13, 2017
Robot dog improves SOF medical practices By Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley | December 6, 2017
Gulf Coast hosts realistic military training RAVEN By Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley | November 15, 2017
MARSOC trains hodge-podge of Marines By Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley | November 15, 2017
Last living WWII OSS Maritime frogman relives history By Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley | October 12, 2017
Tips and passes to final baskets, MARSOC’s fight against the clock By Cpl. Bryann K. Whitley | October 11, 2017
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